SORE – The Meaning Behind a Meaningless Game

I wonder if I got the job?     Did the interviewer like my resume?

I wonder if he enjoyed my personality?    Did he think I was boring?

I’m boring    What’s wrong with me?

Why am I so boring?    I need to change

 I hate myself

Without haste, people drift towards escalating problems easily to suit societies standards, similar to the example provided above. People always tend to search for the “bigger picture”, but when you look too much into the future, the smaller, simpler things can be overlooked. These insecurities can snowball until questions turn to issues, issues turn to actions, and actions can be fatal. Simple things can sometimes make the human mind very anxious and doubtful. Each case of anxiety is different, as the human mind is our most fascinating, yet fragile feature. Unless you suffer from the illness, you can never fully understand the heartache, but SORE gives you a taste in the life of uncertainty by providing just one task… simply leave a room.

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Before I continue, I must say that this review is based on my interpretation of SORE, the mystery behind the game is still unknown.

You begin this dark tale as a ghost stuck in a small room. The sounds of rain splashing against the roof fill your ears, accompanied by an occasional crack of thunder. Shadows engulf this chamber, with only a gleam of moonlight peaking its way through the one window in the room. Within the shadows sways a man, hung from the ceiling. It seemed as if suicide was his only option. The ideal scene set for SORE left me both apprehensive and curious in the best ways possible. Feeling uneasy but ready for more.

It will not take long to find out what your first objective is. Locate and use three keys to unlock the solid door restricting you from the neighboring room. SORE provides little to no information on why reaching the other room is of importance, making me feel no ambition in reaching my goal. SORE begins to get interesting once you peek your head through the window on the door. Interacting with the window allows you to see what the other room looks like. Is it gold? Is it a path to freedom? Is it an even more complex room? No… its a room just as simple, and just as eerie as the one you navigate through the whole game. The only difference is this room has a living man inside. He has the option of saying a variety of different phrases. Some are just random corny jokes, while others are clues to help you find the three keys. What lies in the middle of those two categories is rather disturbing nonsense. If you talk to this man long enough, he will begin to mention that we never talk back to him. It was then I realized something that made this game seem much more eerie… the man does not know we are dead. He cannot see us as a ghost, but instead a hanging corpse. Only his view of the rope is blocked by the walls of the room, so he can only see a motionless and silent man. To his awareness, we are very much alive and well.

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SPOILERS

The first two keys were uncovered rather quickly, but that third key kept me stumped. I spent about 45 minutes searching for the final key until I got hungry and retreated to my kitchen to make a sandwich. Upon my return, I saw the gleam of heavenly light shine out of the wall… the door was open. I entered to room with caution, expecting another set of challenges. The screen grew dark, and then an old-school computer crash screen appeared

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As anyone would be, I was left in confusion. I ran to my trusty friend, the internet, and read how to actually beat the game. The only answers I found left me in anger. There are two ways to beat SORE. You either stand still for six minutes or go up to the door and press “X”. Really? That’s it? Yup! From what the community has found so far, there is, in fact, no working key to unlock the door

I felt cheated…bitter…enraged! I just spent 45 minutes trying to find a key that didn’t exist. On top of that, the door leads to your game “crashing”, leaving you with numerous unanswered questions. I was ready to uninstall the game and abandon the review as a whole, but then I got to thinking. Yes, the game could just be bull**** to waste everyone’s time, or it could be much more profound. Upon looking deeper behind SORE’s unfulfilling story, I have come up with my interpretation of the ending.

Remember when I mentioned how “People always tend to search for the “bigger picture”, but when you look too much into the future, the smaller, more simpler things can be overlooked.”. That is exactly what this game intends for you to do, search for the bigger picture. Once I entered the world of SORE, I immediately started creating a checklist of what to do.

I have to search here, under that, and above there

No one would ever think that all you had to do was press one button, or stand still for six minutes. That would just be way too simple.

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SORE made me irritable. Not only at the game, but at myself as well. As each minute ticked by I was starting to blame myself for not being capable of finding this missing key. I finally gave up, thinking that this game got the best of me.

The pain and anguish could have all been avoided if I took my time and stuck simply. Overthinking can lead to much more pain than a problem has to be. While SORE may have been unfulfilling and quick, this dark mystery teaches a valuable lesson. The lesson is deep and is only understood if you take the time to attempt the impossible… finding that last key.

Enomview Score: 5 out of 10

Check out the game: http://store.steampowered.com/app/690060/SORE/

Figment – A Playful Approach to the Mind’s Trauma

Bedtime Digital Games is back with a new game called Figment. The action-adventure game released in late September of this year has the player controlling Dusty, a guardian of the mind who is needed once again. Chasing down the traumas inflicting the mind, Dusty and his trusty bird friend Piper, travel great distances to seek out and destroy the suffering. Their journey takes them around the brain to areas such as the appropriately named Cerebrum city and Freedom Isles. Join Dusty and Piper in a grand and beautiful world solving complex puzzles and defeating the anguish inflicting the mind once and for all.

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Starting up the game, I immediately plugged in my controller to see what Figment would best be played with. I was in for a pleasant surprise as the controller felt just as good in my hands as the mouse and keyboard, if not better. The vibrations, easy controls, and nostalgia of playing my Xbox sealed the deal for me as I continued the game with the controller. Figment includes more than just a story to follow and enemies to tackle. It includes many sections that aren’t mandatory to continue the story. These usually include memories or as the game calls them, “Remembranes”. One of these Remembranes includes a young boy named Todd who says “Go away, you jerk. I never want to play with you again!”. Remembrances are an insight into why the mind is experiencing all the trauma we see and fight.  You can also knock on the doors of local residents of the mind, and listen as they express their concerns or say a witty comment. Details like this make or break a game and Figment is definitely a stellar example of how including features like these really add to a game’s enjoyment.

The first 10 minutes of the game was basically an introduction to the mechanics and one of the main villains, Nightmare. Dusty obviously isn’t new to the whole saving the mind thing, as Piper drops many hints that they have known each other for a long time. Piper asks Dusty for help once again but he’s reluctant saying that the mind has moved on. Only when Dusty is personally affected by the Nightmare, a skinny purple entity with four arms who steals Dusty’s martini and scrapbook, that he decides to go after it. We retrieve his sword, solve an abundance of simple puzzles, and meet the mayor, who oddly talks only in rhymes, and sends us on a mission to destroy the three sources of trauma.

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From there Dusty and Piper travel into the right hemisphere of the brain, which is a huge change of scenery. We go from a dull, dark and rainy region of the brain, to a bright, vibrant and lively area which is no doubt in reference to a more creative part of the mind. Musical instruments are abundant as guitars, trombones and flutes are placed all over the land, some of which serve as plant life. Within the first five minutes of arriving, we are introduced to the second villain, Plague man. Plague man seems to take advantage of our fear of sickness as he spews toxic gas and summons rodents that sneeze and do damage. As a side note, I’m a fan of how Dusty dies in this game. If you take too much damage from the gas or the rodents, Dusty poofs away in a cloud of smoke only to quickly reappear at the last checkpoint. The death animation isn’t overly done and you are quickly returned to play the game once more.

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As you progress through the game, the puzzles become more and more complex. Figment isn’t a type of game that you can breeze through. It requires thinking, patience and the occasional YouTube walk through and for some people, this is their cup of tea.

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I’m sure we can all think of a period in our life where our heads were filled with darkness and despair. We all go through it, everything in our life isn’t going to go as perfectly as we’d like to. Sometimes we are troubled with anxiety, depression, and fear and this is what the game bases its story off of. The antagonists in the game are our real-life fears visualized as quirky and humorous villains that perform the occasional musical performances. They run like cowards as you bravely continue your journey to rid the minds of the difficulties. Figment takes a playful approach to the very grim realities many people face on a day to day basis. It’s a game for all age groups and each group will enjoy and analyze the game differently. In the end, Figment is about facing your fears and how life is just one big game that shouldn’t be taken too seriously.

I enjoyed many aspects of the game and had little to complain about. The dazzling and elegant world the game had to offer was one of its finest qualities. It was filled with detail with more than just a story to follow. Knocking on the doors of the inhabitants, I found myself curious about what everyone had to say. Perhaps if the residents walked out of their house, and showed their faces instead of just lighting up a window, it would’ve added to the game’s great design. Although the combat was light, it was solid enough. Figment isn’t entirely about combat but when you slay your enemies you get the feeling of satisfaction that makes you want to do it all over again.The combat can feel a bit frustrating at times as the enemies routinely disappear and reappear as they cycle through their abilities. This is mostly solved as some of the enemies share a health pool, so once one of them dies, so do the rest. The puzzles can sometimes seem overwhelming as the setting zooms out and you can see all the different parts that you have to deal with. However, completing one, especially a long complex puzzle gives you a sense of gratification that keeps the game moving. Finally, the musical performances add a great touch to the game. The catchy tunes are placed perfectly with the situations and I found myself humming to them sometimes. Overall the game has good combat, thought-provoking puzzles, fetching music and a diverse and stylish environment that connects to the ever-growing anxiety, depression, and sickness around the world.  

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Enomview Score: 8 out of 10

Check out the game: http://store.steampowered.com/app/493540/Figment/

F**KING LEARN TO CODE ALREADY!!

Like seriously, just do it. Get it over with already.

Many people, game developers and plebs alike, have a habit of instantly dismissing the idea of even trying to learn how to code. They feel it will be too difficult, too complex, or too hard for their little non-genius pea brains to ever fully understand, let alone master.

Whether you are a game designer, quest writer, modeler, or even a concept artist, being able to not only say that you know just a little bit about coding for video games is a huge plus in the games industry. It makes you more of an asset to studios, making it easier for them to select you for a job. It allows you to have a fuller understanding of both the possibilities and the limitations of whatever kind of game it is you’re trying to make. It permits you a window not only into the artistic side of game development, but the mythical technical side as well.

As hard as it may seem on the surface, coding is indeed a difficult skill to learn, but if you’re anything like me, it’s not nearly as hard as you probably think it is. Many among us think you need to be a math genius to code. They think that you need to know the ins and outs of every processor, every logic gate, every single, small, consecutive bit of a computer’s near-endless streams of binary, AND have a PhD in computer science, linear algebra, calculus, anddddd maybe one in theoretical physics… just for good measure of course.

…But what if I were to tell you that everything we think we know about coding…

…is wrong?

This is your last chance. After this, there is no turning back. Take the blue pill, and the story ends. You wake up in your bed and believe whatever you want to believe about coding and game development. Take the red pill, you stay in wonderland, and I show you just how deep this glorious, gaming rabbit hole goes.

 

So, you’ve taken the red pill. Marvelous. Paul Elam will be pleased.

First off, being able to look at computers and coding from a broader point of view helps, and this is where knowledge of computer science can really come into play. However, let the rumors that you need to be a math genius be washed away! Let all theoretical physicists with their theoretical degrees be cast aside! Using this post found on Data US, we can accurately determine what skills your average computer programmer does and doesn’t need to succeed.

 

 

Hard math does indeed still play a role, but as one will find, skills like Reading Comprehension, Critical Thinking, Writing, and quite ironically, Programming, hold more sway in the realms of coding than math ever could.

So what will be our great takeaway from all this after we’re through? Well, it helps to be a problem-solver, not a mathematician. 

You see my friends, coding is actually quite simple. You just need to first learn about 7-8 different robot languages equal to or greater in complexity to conventional human languages like Spanish, Chinese, or Arabic, use those robot languages to seamlessly knit strings of extensive elements from your 7-8 different robot languages together to sew the threads of a much larger, much more advanced electronic system stretching thousands of characters across your choice of a strange thing called a compiler or your poor, poor Notepad files, finally test them again and again for errors, always trying to go back and fix these errors with the full knowledge that every repair creates a new error no matter what it is that say or do, and finally, use Google for everything whenever you’re confused because all of this is too hard.

In the words of many of the programmers and coders I know, it’s like a cute little puzzle. Easy, right? Well, just in case it wasn’t, I am going to PROVE to you that it is. I will be using my amateur coding knowledge to show you, in the simplest possible way, how all of this really works behind the scenes. (And yes, I got pics fam)

DISCLAIMER: I am but a humble gaming journalist. Please, if you think I am getting a big head, remember I openly admit to the fact that I know nothing of programming. Please don’t hurt my precious feelings in the comments below );


ENOMVIEW PRESENTS…

HOW TO CODE IN HTML

(for noobs)

Ladies, gentlemen, let’s do this shit.

 

1) Our Elements and our Robot Language

To start, we will be coding in HTML (durr hurr). HTML, our robot language, stands for HyperText Markup Language. All that HTML is used for is to mark up text on a screen, usually for a webpage.

An element is something that you type to tell the computer what you want it to do. The <h1> element is used to show text in size 1 heading format, whereas the <p> element is used to show text in the paragraph format.

(You edit your code in Notepad or a special program called a compiler, credits to w3schools.com for letting me use theirs. This is what it looks like inside.)

(This is what it looks like on the other end.) 

Both of these elements have beginning brackets (<h1>, <p>) and closing brackets (</h1>, </p>) to signify when the text of a particular element should start and end. If we flipped the <h1> and <p> elements, our input and output would look like this:

(our input)

(our output)

I know, very difficult to understand, isn’t it? While you did get to see the output in its entirety, parts of the input were hidden to you.

(full input, as seen in the code editor) 

<!DOCTYPE html> = Something we type at the beginning of every HTML document so the computer knows that all the text below is to be read in HTML.

<html> = All the text in between these brackets are a part of the HTML code.

<body> = All the text that goes in the main body of your webpage.

I know, it gets harder by the minute. Just wait, it gets worse.

 

2) More Elements

Now we will introduce just a few more elements. We will also introduce an attribute, which is like an add-on for a larger element.

 

<img> = for image links. Unlike many elements, <img> does not have an ending bracket.

(src stands for source link/ file of the image)

 

<b> = used to make text bold.

(input)

(output)

 

Now, let those precious morsels of information ooze into your braincase for a moment. Let them absorb before moving onto the next step.

 

3) Building a Basic Website

So, to get the fullest understanding of all our tools, we are going to be coding a generic 1990s-lookin’ website centered around bears.

Here is all the information we need to code in:


(the background of the webpage should be pink)

Today’s Top 3 Bears (header)

Hello, internet. Here at Bears.com, we have worked especially hard to bring you today’s daily top-tier specimens.

#3: The Black Bear

https://qph.fs.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-4617713b2614c4f9eaa7b222ec270b01-c (image link)

The American black bear (Ursus americanus) is a medium-sized bear native to North America. It is the continent’s smallest and most widely distributed bear species. … American black bears often mark trees using their teeth and claws as a form of communication with other bears, a behavior common to many species of bears.

#2: The Brown Bear

https://beartrust.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/Bear-Den-photo.jpg (image link)

The brown bear (Ursus arctos) is a bear that is found across much of northern Eurasia and North America. It is one of the largest living terrestrial members of the order Carnivora, rivaled in size only by its closest relative, the polar bear (Ursus maritimus), which is much less variable in size and slightly larger on average.

#1: The Grizzly Bear

https://cbsnews3.cbsistatic.com/hub/i/r/2018/04/28/c6cb470f-edb2-4329-a6ad-af3ad788c2d6/thumbnail/620×350/33556a377976d139b012d206c4908170/istock-695736858.jpg (image link)

The grizzly bear is a large population of the brown bear inhabiting North America. Scientists generally do not use the name grizzly bear but call it the North American brown bear.

All information taken from Wikipedia.


Now, like a puzzle, we are going to put all our pieces together using all the information displayed above.

 

4) Putting the Puzzle Together

First thing’s first, we pull up our code editor and put in all the basic stuff that we need for every HTML document like <!DOCTYPE html>, <html>, and <body>.

First, we place our header, “Today’s Top 3 Bears”, and the introductory sentence, “Hello internet. Here at Bears.com, we have worked especially hard to bring you today’s daily top-tier specimens.” down into the code. We nestle into the <body> element because it is a part of the main body of text of our webpage.

(input)

(output) 

Next, we add in our first small header, “#3: The Black Bear” and it’s accompanying image link, “https://qph.fs.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-4617713b2614c4f9eaa7b222ec270b01-c”,  and text, “The American black bear (Ursus americanus) is a medium-sized bear native to North America. It is the continent’s smallest and most widely distributed bear species. … American black bears often mark trees using their teeth and claws as a form of communication with other bears, a behavior common to many species of bears.” We will also make sure to bold the necessary words.

(input) 

(output) 

Then we do that same thing again two mores times with the other types of bears.

(input) 

(output 1)

(output 2:)


So then, it seems like we’re all done. Good job all around, eh?

But wait!! We needed a pink background! We don’t know how to get it, so where could we go to figure that out?

But of course. Google, you are my only true friend on this Earth.

And so, my search brought me to this Wikihow link.

Now, to apply the changes…

(input) 

(output)

Perfect. Ready for the net of ’97.


Conclusion

So, now that we have gone through everything in that little tutorial, what’s our great takeaway? Well, coding init of itself is something the large majority of people overthink. It’s true that many programmers need to be able to code in 4-5 different languages, but seeing to how they can all those languages can be very similar, things get significantly easier after you learn your first, then move onto your second and third.

Keep in mind, this was all in HTML. That’s not even technically a programming language, but a markup language. Things obviously do get MUCH more complex with the number of variables at play, and you’re VERY far from being a web developer, let alone a game developer.

However, the basics are all still the same. Fit the pieces together, use Google, and be a problem-solver.

Some handy resources:

w3schools.com = free online tutorials for languages like HTML, Javascript, and PHP. Used by university students looking to earn a degree in web development.

w3resource.com = additional tutorials and exercises to expand upon what you’ve learned on w3schools.com.

How to Code in C# = youtube video playlist dedicated to beginners who wish to learn one of game development’s most useful languages: C#

C++ Programming Tutorials = another youtube playlist explaining how to code in C++, another useful language in game development.

I choose to learn more about coding, choose to accept that you’ll make mistakes. If you’ll notice in my walkthrough, I failed to put my image links in quotations like I was supposed to. I also didn’t write my <head> elements out right off the bat with everything else before going to work.

Now you have a taste of what it’s like. You know how it can help you.

So fucking get it over with already. Learn. How. To code.

Liked this article? Check out our many other articles on Indie Development: https://enomview.com/category/indie-development/

Oh, and here’s a careful reminder from mini-Shia to remind you to just do it.

Fortnite – Marvel Infinity War Crossover LTM

As a lot of you have probably heard by now, Fortnite has released a limited time mode which is a mash-up between the normal Fortnite Battle Royale, and Marvel’s main villain from Infinity War, Thanos.
The game mode is an amazing amount of fun for the amount of time I’ve put into it and it is by far my favorite limited time event they have released so far. The idea of the game is that you drop in an already closing circle and once the battle bus disappears the Infinity Gauntlet will drop from the sky as a meteor and strike a random spot in the circle.
After that, it’s free game to whoever can pick up the gauntlet to wield the mighty power of Thanos. Now you won’t see Thanos just running around with a gold scar, he has his own ability set which sets him apart from the other players:

Power Stone – Thanos uses the Power Stone as his main weapon for range by unleashing a line of power towards his enemies. This attack is a beam that you can follow the enemy with for a short amount of time dealing 15 damage for every hit.

Time Stone – The Time Stone is used in an odd way for this event, as it is Thanos’ Melee weapon. He uses the time stone to “Send them to a different time zone” as the kill feed will say. The melee attack is a straight lunge and destroys breakable objects around it.

Mind Stone – The Mind Stone is used by Thanos to jump exceptionally high. Thanos does not have a normal jump, but instead a jump that will charge up and allow for him to jump almost as high as the top of a mountain. This ability is useful for trying to get out of combat or to combo with the melee attack which I will describe below.

Mind/Time Stone Combo – If Thanos jumps into the air and then uses a melee attack, he will dive into the ground and create a small crater where he lands. This attack deals a lot of damage and can in most instances one-hit if the enemy is under you. But, it can also be used to destroy buildings quickly, because that the ability will go straight through any breakable objects.

Now, all of these abilities make it seem like Thanos is an all-powerful god who is unkillable (as he should be), but there is a couple of other things you should note.
– Although Thanos has 700 health and 300 shield, he cannot regain any health, and only regains shield through killing other players
– Thanos is visible to all other players on the map, minimap, and radar throughout the entire game.
– Thanos cannot build.
Once we take all of that into account, it really isn’t that difficult to kill Thanos, you just need to have a little bit of skill. And, once Thanos dies, the Gauntlet drops as an item for anyone else to pick up and wield.
I’m not sure how long this limited time mode is here for, but I hope that this opens the door to more amazing crossovers like this one.

A Man on a Mission – Little Buno Review

What would you do if your entire village was attacked and kidnapped by gorillas? Probably run away and never look back, right? Well, Little Buno does the exact opposite. In the game, you play as a hunter who’s village was ransacked by gorillas looking for food. All the food in the area was taken by the villagers, so the enraged apes sought revenge. When Buno returned from his hunting trip to find a destroyed village, he set out to find and save the villagers.

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The game itself is fairly simple to understand, you can do two things with Buno: walk slowly backwards, and throw bananas. The goal is to throw bananas into the gorilla’s open mouths multiple times to fill up their hunger bar. But, you also need to be constantly backing up to avoid the gorillas getting ahold of you before their hunger bar drops, or it’s game over for Buno. You can only throw the bananas at the gorilla when it opens its mouth. Other than that, you just have to keep backing up. If you consecutively land another banana after the first in a gorilla’s mouth, you gain bonus point to help speed up the level. Some levels also ramp it up a notch by either giving you a limited amount of time to complete the level, or by limiting the number of bananas you can throw, which is normally just slightly over the amount you will need.

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The game is played in a level based format with 60 levels spread out among three different worlds. As you progress through the levels you will unlock upgrades for Buno that increase his stats to help finish levels off even faster. The levels progressively get more difficult as you continue through the game. Some levels can keep you trying forever, where at other points you’ll breeze through multiple levels in minutes. In my opinion, the game is a fun way to kill some time, but they could do more with it. The game only has 60 levels, so I feel like they could add more levels to elongate the gameplay. Also, they could add a sort of “challenge mode” where each level is repeated, but on an entirely different scale of difficulty.

The Brawl to End it All – Stick Fight: The Game Review

Remember when we use to draw stick figures? Or when we used to have those stick figures wield our poorly sketched armaments? Well, take that, add a bucket of awesomeness, and some snake-shooting weapons, and you get Stick Fight: The Game.

Stick Fight: The Game allows you to take control of a stick figure and fight against up to three other opponents. While you fight to the death, varying states of destructive weapons rain from above such as snipers, pistols, rocket launchers, snake guns, flamethrowers, and so much more.

The games key feature is its online mode. This allows you to connect with three random people and begin the carnage instantly, but, there is also a local mode, where two people can use one computer to wage wars on each other. The great thing about local co-op, especially with a game like Stick Fight: The Game, is that it could easily be the centerpiece of any couch party. Gathering around your flat-screen with four controllers and a hunger for beating your inhumanly thin friends just became possible.

The physics of the game are basically non-existent. You can jump twice your height and fire snipers with one hand. The map is entirely dynamic, so you can shoot at anything to destroy it and send your opponent’s plummeting to the depths below. This can be a fun and easy way to win, but your character can also climb onto any surface so they could recover and then you’re in for a nasty surprise.

The dynamic-map aspect is unique to the beat ’em up genre. When coupled with the many different power-ups you can use to decimate the map, it becomes a truly invigorating match with a satisfying victory.

I do wish that there was access to more maps. As far as I can tell, there are only three or four. If a community map building update of some sort was released, it would make for a lot of fun for every player. There is no tutorial for the game, but that is quickly overlooked as the game is easy enough to understand in the first two or three matches.

Finally, there is a feature in the game to talk with other players, so I took this opportunity to get some feedback from others within my intense matches. They had this to say: 

“This game is a great way to spend an hour or two”
“My favorite fighting game I’ve found on steam for under $5”
“I love this game because of the unrealistic weapons (like this snake gun)”

EnomView Score: 9 out of 10

Check out the game: http://store.steampowered.com/app/674940/Stick_Fight_The_Game/

Darkly Atmospheric – Darkwood Review

There’s a quiet and tense energy that pervades the world of Darkwood. It’s not a traditional horror game in that there are monsters leaping out at you from every shadow – but it’s this that makes it even scarier.

Developers Acid Wizard Studio reportedly decided to create a horror game of their own as a result of not being fans of the genre, and after a successful Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign, and a sometimes difficult four years of development in Steam Early Access, Darkwood officially launched in August 2017.

In many ways, this lack of background in horror shines through positively throughout the game. For a start, the top-down mechanic is at least rare, if not unique, in the genre. And all too often, horror games go for the jump scares, while Darkwood prefers a more psychological brand of terror.

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It begins innocuously enough – in the prologue, you play as a man living in a forest cabin and the game teaches you how to move around and manage your inventory. Things get a bit more sinister as you decide whether or not to euthanise your dying dog, and shortly afterwards Darkwood takes a deep breath and takes a long journey into the strange and surreal.

One of the first lessons you learn is to never, ever, under any circumstances, go outside during the night, because you will die a horrible and painful death. The lifeblood of this notion is the gasoline that fuels the generator in your shelter; as long as the lights are on, the paranormal beasties will stay away. Mostly. There are exceptions, such as the foreboding but unaggressive figure who imparts this nocturnal advice, standing with the body of a man and the head of a wolf.

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Cleverly, Darkwood slowly descends into madness, instead of plunging straight in deep. For the first few nights, not much might happen. But I recall early into the story, I was huddled in the bedroom of my shelter when the door swung open. There was nothing there. Another time I was pacing impatiently when I turned back around to find a person sat crying on the bed, desperate to go home.

As the loading screen warns you, Darkwood doesn’t hold you by the hand. Hence my confusion when, despite the earlier warning to never, EVER go outside at night, someone or something began knocking at the door after darkness had fallen. In such a situation, you’re gripped by a terrible indecision; do you go and open the door, or do you ignore it? It’s moments like these that truly set Darkwood aside from other horror games.

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Suffice to say that these are just the tip of a psychedelic iceberg that descends into trippier and scarier depths as the game continues, but I wouldn’t want to be the one to ruin the experience for a new player.

Despite the strange and terrible things that occur, there’s a reassuring logic that sits somewhere in the background; while it doesn’t hold your hand, neither does the game try and trip you up by changing the rules on you for the sake of adding confusion.

While it’s good, things aren’t perfect. The combat system feels very clunky to operate, and particularly from the mid-game on, it’s really difficult to walk away from a fight – and not in an “I appreciated the challenge” type of way.

But that’s a relatively small part of an otherwise phenomenal game. I’m a big fan of minimalist graphic styles, and here we can see an example of a game that basically just uses different shades of grey throughout and look amazing.

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And the sound quality alone is almost worth the cost of admission – moody, sombre drones ramp up the feeling of dread without you even realising it, particularly when you go anywhere near your lupine acquaintance.

Despite a somewhat clunky combat system, Darkwood presents a fresh and engaging take on the horror genre, which stays true to its roots at the same time as striking off in a new direction. Developed by guys who don’t normally like horror games, this one is bound to appeal to scare junkies and newcomers alike.

EnomView Score: 8 out of 10

One Strike Review – The Quick and Easy Fighter

Have you ever been playing a fighting game and thought to yourself, “this is way too hard?” Well, One Strike is the solution to that exact problem. The game is so simple that it only takes about two-three minutes to be a master at it. The game revolves around six characters who you have the option of playing as. With the character you pick, you will then face off against said six characters back to back. The main catch of the game is that if either player is hit once, they lose. So in the story mode, if you get hit you will restart back to your first fight.

There isn’t much story to the game, it is basically just a 2D, pixelated fighter where you go from fight to fight. The other game modes are a versus mode, which I personally believe would be more fun than the game itself, a tag team mode where you play with an AI against two other AI, a Tournament mode, which puts you into a bracket tournament with up to seven other players, and a “practice” like mode where you face off against the enemies from the story with five lives instead of one. The problem I see with the Tournament mode is the ability to have seven players playing at once. There is no online interaction with the game so it would have to be eight people clustered around a computer with only two playing at a time. And if you do not have eight people for the mode, it replaces them with bots.

The story mode has three difficulties, which are easy, medium, and hard. Easy is in my own opinion far too easy, so once beaten I moved on to medium difficulty, which ramped up the difficulty a little bit, but not enough for it to be a challenge. Finally, when I reached hard mode I was expecting a huge jump in the difficulty of the AI, but alas, I was wrong. All in all, it took me about an hour and a half to beat every difficulty on the main story.

In my personal opinion, the game is not that great, it’s not even that good, but I still gave it a shot and it kept me busy for a while. A few things that could help it out would be to increase the number of characters, thus making the story longer, and have a custom control setup. The controls were kind of tight on the keyboard. The game isn’t inherently bad, it just lacks a story and seemed too easy to master, which is why I did not enjoy it.

With some changes made, I’d love to revisit this article and give it another shot!

EnomView Score 4/10

Liked this review and looking for more cool games? Check out our Steam games section, here!

Medieval Combat Done Right – Mordhau Trailer and Overview

Mordhau, planned for release sometime early this year, is a first-person medieval combat game which has recently been gaining a lot of traction.

While much is yet to be revealed, what we do know is that you play as a knight boasting a sword, slashing at the other players as they charge at you with their weapons.

The combat system is based around mouse-dragging, moving it from side to side to make the sword swing in different ways, at any angle. For example, you could be going up against someone trying to poke at you with their sword, while you come in and in 1 quick swoop take off his head. The system is largely based on Chivalry: Medieval Combat, however, it is said to get rid of the many exploits C:MC had.

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(Yes, this is an actual screenshot from the game)

The graphics in Mordhau are absolutely stunning! The game looks almost photo-realistic, with shimmering chain-mail all the way to the deep red blood. They put so much effort into the looks of every single aspect of the game. So much so that some screenshots almost look like they’re from real life! It’s a shame we can’t play it for ourselves yet.

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If you want to see more, you can go to their official website or their Twitter account.

Mordhau’s Gameplay Trailer: