Graveyard Keeper – Three tips for Beginners

Graveyard Keeper has been an exciting experience so far. I was drawn in by its gorgeous pixel art aesthetic and the promise of managing my cemetery, but like any wary gamer, I didn’t let myself get buoyed by the hype. Fortunately, the game has proved to be a pleasant surprise. I enjoy management sims, even more so if it has a medieval setting, and I think Graveyard Keeper has done an excellent job in making the occupation more fun than it sounds.

To start with, although your primary objective is to keep the graveyard spiffy and well maintained, while you harvest meat from fresh cadavers on the side, there is a lot more to be done as you progress. With each NPC introduced, you get saddled with more tasks. I’d admit that it gets tiring. Keeping track of quests, trying to recall where and when you can find NPCs or objects, can turn ugly quickly, especially when you’re still learning the ropes and figuring things out.

After fumbling in the dark in the beginning hours of my playthrough, I wish some things in the game were made more apparent from the start. Here are things I wish I knew before I started playing:

1. Sleeping saves the game

It’s embarrassing, but I once played for twenty minutes and exited thinking that the game would autosave. Luckily, I’d only just started, so I didn’t lose much progress. It pained me to earn back my lost momentum, but I’m thankful I learned the lesson sooner rather than later. Some gamers might scoff and think it’s stupid not to know from the get-go. In my defense, the only reason I shut off the game without bothering to check was because I had a piping hot pizza waiting in the living room.

Stardew Valley employs a similar save system, but in Graveyard Keeper, you have the ability to save anytime you’d like. It makes your in-game daily schedule flexible and less stressful. This is a definite positive; there might be moments where something essential crops up and you won’t have the luxury of waiting for the day to end before you can save. If you run out of energy, remember that jumping into bed for a quick nap is an option.

2. Where to find important resources

If you’re the type who likes to explore and don’t mind spending time looking for items or objects, you can skip this tip. The map isn’t exceptionally large, but it can be a hassle if you want something before the day goes dark. There are also some items that can’t be found, only made.

  • The swamp area behind your house contains iron deposits and slimes
  • Check your skill tree to unlock techniques to craft nails, iron parts, wood planks, etc.
  • Seeds can be bought from the farmer at the bottom of the wheat field
  • Buy seeds in fours. You can only plant them in fours.
  • Apples can be found near the Lighthouse

I played for two hours without realizing I could find iron behind my house. Don’t be me.

3. The ‘Known NPCs’ menu 

I’ve seen several user reviews on Steam saying they wished the game had a quest log. There isn’t a dedicated quest log, which is a little unfortunate. However, the quests you get can be viewed in the Known NPCs menu option, under their respective NPCs.

In addition, the days on which certain NPCs will appear can be found just on top of their character. It’s hard to notice it when you’re continually flipping through menus since they’re pretty tiny.

Overall, I hope these are helpful to anyone who’s just started the game. The learning curve is steep, but it gets a lot more fun once you get into the swing of things. If you’re thinking of getting the game, check out Justin’s review of it here!