A Profound Adventure That’ll Reach Your Core – Home is Where One Starts Review

Have you ever felt like no one cared? Like you were alone in a world much too big? That’s the feeling of your character while playing through Home is Where One Starts.

The journey begins one day as you wait at the end of your driveway for the bus you had already missed. After you wait for the bus, you’re allowed to explore the area around your house. All the while your character is reminiscing about memories of her past. You can interact with items that spur more memories or allow you to continue with your story. The game also has wonderful music playing throughout your play-through, which is soothing and helps to guide your mind to better understand the character you are being shown.

The world looks beautiful, but that beauty is overshadowed by the pure sadness shown through your characters voice as she relives her past. She talks about the good aspects of her home, but also the bad things. The very bad things. She mentions her father, who is never seen, but from the mass amount of cigarette butts and liquor bottles you can make a guess at what he’s like. Eventually, you’ll find a small graveyard, this allows you to remember something in your fathers dresser, something that will help you get away.


As for the areas, there is a small house which you and your father lived in, your shed in the woods, the hay bales across the street, and even a torn down house next door. Each of these areas help to further the story in their own way, but the one I liked the most was the field behind the house. There wasn’t much there, but just walking through the field was calming and felt almost like a break from the sadness in the game.

The game does have a deep story which will draw you in, but the problem is that there isn’t much to do and there is no guiding point on where to go either. It felt less like a walking simulator, and more like a wandering simulator at times. I stumbled around for quite a while before finding the final of my journey. But for all the wandering I went through, it was worth it to get to the end and see the final scene of the game, and the first bit of real happiness that your character is allowed to have.

EnomView Score: 6 out of 10