One Strike Review – The Quick and Easy Fighter

Have you ever been playing a fighting game and thought to yourself, “this is way too hard?” Well, One Strike is the solution to that exact problem. The game is so simple that it only takes about two-three minutes to be a master at it. The game revolves around six characters who you have the option of playing as. With the character you pick, you will then face off against said six characters back to back. The main catch of the game is that if either player is hit once, they lose. So in the story mode, if you get hit you will restart back to your first fight.

There isn’t much story to the game, it is basically just a 2D, pixelated fighter where you go from fight to fight. The other game modes are a versus mode, which I personally believe would be more fun than the game itself, a tag team mode where you play with an AI against two other AI, a Tournament mode, which puts you into a bracket tournament with up to seven other players, and a “practice” like mode where you face off against the enemies from the story with five lives instead of one. The problem I see with the Tournament mode is the ability to have seven players playing at once. There is no online interaction with the game so it would have to be eight people clustered around a computer with only two playing at a time. And if you do not have eight people for the mode, it replaces them with bots.

The story mode has three difficulties, which are easy, medium, and hard. Easy is in my own opinion far too easy, so once beaten I moved on to medium difficulty, which ramped up the difficulty a little bit, but not enough for it to be a challenge. Finally, when I reached hard mode I was expecting a huge jump in the difficulty of the AI, but alas, I was wrong. All in all, it took me about an hour and a half to beat every difficulty on the main story.

In my personal opinion, the game is not that great, it’s not even that good, but I still gave it a shot and it kept me busy for a while. A few things that could help it out would be to increase the number of characters, thus making the story longer, and have a custom control setup. The controls were kind of tight on the keyboard. The game isn’t inherently bad, it just lacks a story and seemed too easy to master, which is why I did not enjoy it.

With some changes made, I’d love to revisit this article and give it another shot!

EnomView Score 4/10

Liked this review and looking for more cool games? Check out our Steam games section, here!

Inner Space Releases this Tuesday – Trailer

A space flight adventure game developed by Polyknights called Inner Space is being released on Tuesday, tomorrow. Inner Space is an exploration flying game set in a world where physics are inverted. Take command of an unnamed cartographer as you adventure the bubble worlds, collect relics, and encounter each bubbles deity to discover more about its history. You can pick up this game on Linux, Mac OSX, PS4, Switch, Windows, and Xbox One on January 18, 2018!

Note from the creators:

We started PolyKnight Games back in college, when we would meet after class to talk about new challenges in game design. We became fixated on one question in particular: “What would a flying game be like in a universe of inside-out planets?” To answer that question, we decided to put aside our career plans and form our own indie studio.

If you like the idea of a plane that transforms into a submarine, then dives inside the belly of an ancient demigod, you’re in the right place.

 

 

Inner Space Trailer:

You can check out the game’s Steam page here or their website, here.

A Profound Adventure That’ll Reach Your Core – Home is Where One Starts Review

Have you ever felt like no one cared? Like you were alone in a world much too big? That’s the feeling of your character while playing through Home is Where One Starts.

The journey begins one day as you wait at the end of your driveway for the bus you had already missed. After you wait for the bus, you’re allowed to explore the area around your house. All the while your character is reminiscing about memories of her past. You can interact with items that spur more memories or allow you to continue with your story. The game also has wonderful music playing throughout your play-through, which is soothing and helps to guide your mind to better understand the character you are being shown.

The world looks beautiful, but that beauty is overshadowed by the pure sadness shown through your characters voice as she relives her past. She talks about the good aspects of her home, but also the bad things. The very bad things. She mentions her father, who is never seen, but from the mass amount of cigarette butts and liquor bottles you can make a guess at what he’s like. Eventually, you’ll find a small graveyard, this allows you to remember something in your fathers dresser, something that will help you get away.


As for the areas, there is a small house which you and your father lived in, your shed in the woods, the hay bales across the street, and even a torn down house next door. Each of these areas help to further the story in their own way, but the one I liked the most was the field behind the house. There wasn’t much there, but just walking through the field was calming and felt almost like a break from the sadness in the game.

The game does have a deep story which will draw you in, but the problem is that there isn’t much to do and there is no guiding point on where to go either. It felt less like a walking simulator, and more like a wandering simulator at times. I stumbled around for quite a while before finding the final of my journey. But for all the wandering I went through, it was worth it to get to the end and see the final scene of the game, and the first bit of real happiness that your character is allowed to have.

EnomView Score: 6 out of 10