The Most Depressing Thing About They Are Billions Isn’t The Zombies

In the bleak, far future of They Are Billions, humanity has mostly fallen to an endless wave of billions of zombies. Your plucky group of colonists has ventured to the frontier to try and carve a new settlement among the sea of hungry, animated corpses. At any moment, they could break through the perimeter and destroy everything you and your community have worked to create.

But despite the constant threat of undead destruction, the most depressing thing about They Are Billions isn’t the zombies – it’s that so far along the destruction of humanity itself, capitalism has still survived.

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One of the primary (and probably the most important) resources of the game is gold – with it you pay for building maintenance, research upgrades and pay wages. More citizens in your colony means more coin you can raise by tax to pay for all of that good stuff.

How depressing is the thought that after everything else about humanity has been stripped away, all that’s left is to go to work, pay your taxes and hope you don’t get munched on by the billions of zombies on the other side of the city walls? I can do two out of three of those right now!

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I mean, what could the denizens of this post-apocalyptic steampunk world possibly be doing with all of that cash? It looks like art galleries, organised sport, nail salons and cinemas all took a major hit when the zombies attacked.

Judging by the soundbites of the military units, the Soldiers spend all of their spare time in their bunk “cleaning their weapon”, while the Rangers spend every evening lost in erotic bliss, almost too tired to perform their duties the next day. I don’t even want to know what the flame-loving Lucifer does during his time off.

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Thanos seems like he’d be fun on a night out, but there’s not even anywhere to go and get a drink. Unless you count the Tavern of Doom that pops up on Google Maps near your new colony. The place is under new management, and the locals seem a bit feisty, but it might be worth a look, it says that they’re offering a new menu.

Maybe you could mount a few strobe lights on the city walls, blast out some Kraftwerk and pretend you’re at a rave. All of those vacant faces waiting to get in to a venue remind me of a few nights out.

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Even the scientists are at it, sitting in their workshops on the edge of extinction with the rest of humanity, holding the essential secrets of sustaining human life – but not without a paycheck first, of course. Next, the government will be increasing tuition fees to try and plug the gap budget cuts make in grant funding.

But it’s not all bad out on the ragged edge. At least there’s still a democratic process, with periodically elected mayors granting bonuses to your colony with big promises and boons granted to them by private industry, like extra buildings, free technology or bonus troops. Almost a bit like a bribe. So, actually, pretty much like it is now.

Maybe life won’t be so different once the zombie apocalypse hits after all – get a house, get a job, pay your taxes and vote for the lesser of two evils. The only real difference is you’ll literally be eaten alive at the end.

Check out EnomView’s review of the excellent, ruthlessly challenging zombie RTS They Are Billions by clicking right here, and check out the game on Steam.

Indie Game Movies – Don’t Go There

Video game movies have been, more or less, not done well at all. While there have been good movies about people playing video games, movies based off of the lore of a game have resulted in failure after failure along with some moderate semi-successes. Let’s face it, though, there has never been a huge blow out success in video game movies. Silent Hill, Resident Evil (the first one), Mortal Kombat, Warcraft and maybe you could count Wreck-It Ralph among the decent successes. Although, Wreck-It Ralph was not based off of a single existing video game storyline (and, ironically, the video game sucked). There are several reasons why the VG movies are not successful, and fail to bring in any kind of serious cash as far as audiences are concerned.

Now, there is talk of the serious successes in the indie game culture becoming feature-length films. To no one’s great surprise, producers are making the same mistakes that they always make. They think that just because something is a huge multi-million dollar success, they can capture that lightning in a bottle in another form and the property will just sell itself. This is 100% wrong! You can’t just slap a label onto a movie and just magically make people pay for it! The thought of indie games starting their own generation of movies may sound ridiculous, but guess what, Angry Birds was a phone game based on simple mechanics and a simple physics engine. IT COULD HAPPEN TO INDIE GAMES NEXT.

So, what if they make a good indie game movie? Well, that would be wonderful! Many would love to see an amazing iteration of something such as Castle Crashers in the form of a movie. Well, of course the characters would have to actually have voices when they talk, which they did not in the game, so that would kind of ruin one aspect of their identity. Then they would more than likely have to not exist in the 2D visuals, they would have close-ups and different angles. Then the ladies you have to save would have those shrill screams that no one really wants to hear. Honestly, it would just turn into your normal, generic fantasy cartoon movie that’s been done to death. Yes, there are ways of capturing it, but you would need to do some thinking, which is not the strong suit of bigwig producers.

What if they wanted to do Cuphead? Cuphead was a smash-hit success! Of course, there have been ideas of making a movie out of it. Well, there’s the problem of the cell art and the hand-drawn animation that is all but a dead practice nowadays. So they would more than likely snatch that away in favor of that balloon-like 3D CGI animation that they’re turning everything into. Well, there goes one of Cuphead’s most defining features. They couldn’t possibly have the DEVIL in a kid’s cartoon movie, so they’d have to replace him with Santa instead, so while they are on their journey to repay Santa for the bet they made against his elves, they would need to wag their fingers at snowmen and reindeer, because obviously, we can’t have scary monsters and sea beasts attacking them with intent to kill them. And the wagging fingers certainly can’t have gunshots of any kind because guns are just not appropriate for the demographic they are aiming for. Our children are entirely too fragile for such horrific images. So we will be joining Cuphead and Mugman on their voyage to the North Pole with their horrific debt to Santa Claus and the twenty large they owe Dasher.

Games are games for a reason. You can’t turn Amnesia into a full-length horror film because it would just be a samey horror flick we’ve seen twenty million times. Dark halls with torches and empty libraries and something in the background going “Ooooo!” It’s different for games because as the player we have a new way of experiencing these events and have an interactivity that we wouldn’t have through the ways of the motion picture.

Don’t get the wrong idea of this article, there can be good video game movies, and there have been some decent success rates with a small number of them. It’s just the problem of the dollar bill. Some production companies can’t see an inch in front of their nose when the thought of spending money is involved. The only thing they want is what test audiences want to see, they don’t care about the fandom that loves the property. They want to aim in all different directions, so they play it entirely safe and add in all of the things that they think the vast populace wants. Thus, they water down the premise in favor of a flavorless, soulless piece of trash that barely resembles the source material.

The biggest problem with large production companies have all the money, they just lack the creativity, while indie companies have been known to possess creativity, just lack the funds to make their movies the way they would want to. There is always a chance that some small production company will come along and create the most immaculate, money-making fan-servicing video game movie that the world has ever seen. It could be a smash hit success that could triumph even over one such as the Dark Knight or, dare I say it, Titanic. The world will all line up for miles around the corner to see this gargantuan supergiant of a film, and all shall bow down to its majesty!

That will be the day we all shall praise and recognize the glorious divinity that is Plants vs Zombies: The Motion Picture!

 

How to Make Your First Game

For just about every gamer there is in the world, there are about a half a hundred game ideas just waiting to be tapped into. If I had a dime for every time that I’ve heard one, I think I’d be rich enough to provide every cent that Rockstar needed to make GTA 6 a reality. For many, these are just ideas, but for others, these are the beginning baby steps into a long, glorious future in game design, and we here at EnomView want nothing more than to set those beginners on the right track. Here are some helpful tips to get you started:


1. Idea & Scope

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The first part of this step is simple enough: have an idea! Was there ever a game-related passion project you wanted to start on? A concept you wanted to make into something tangible? If so, then now’s the time to take that idea and practically apply it.

The second part of this step, however, is much more tricky.

>>>Think small.<<<

While you should definitely let your imagination run wild, you have to remember that this is the first time you’ve stepped up to the plate, bat at-the-ready. You shouldn’t expect your game to sell, nor should you be trying to make something comparable to AAA titles like Assassin’s Creed, The Elder Scrolls, or Call of Duty. Instead, shoot for something like a mobile app game, or one of the more simple flash games you’d find on Kongregate or Armorgames.

If you have some sort of other talents you can use, like art or writing, then by all means, use it. However, since you’ll most likely be working on this all on your own–and again–this is your first project, you’ll want to worry first and foremost about the gameplay and mechanics, not the stylization of it all. Record a basic synopsis of that idea somewhere safe and keep that synopsis handy.

There are lots of strategies to creating good mechanics, but if you want more help with those before you start or maybe just need some inspiration, then I’m going to recommend the following links:

Snoman Gaming (Quick videos going over examples of good game design in popular indie and AAA games)

GDC (Videos of lectures given by professional designers at the Game Design Con)

Extra Credits (A channel recommended to me personally by several designers who’ve been making games for years)

2. Game On

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Play games similar to the one you want to make, but don’t just mess around, analyze them. Try to break them, exploit their faults and glitches, figure out what they did right and what they did wrong. Try to look at these games not only from the perspective of a player, but a developer, and determine why the systems put in place were chosen. Use the knowledge you’ve gained and edit the information on your recorded synopsis as necessary.

3. Pick an Engine

Things weren’t this easy at this stage back in the old days, but thankfully times have changed. It’s now possible to make something that people all over the world will fall in love with and not even have to touch the code. Every one of the engines listed below has their perks. While you can truthfully use any one that you so please, certain engines will work better for certain types of games.

Gamemaker Studio 2 – Used to make games like Death’s Gambit and Undertale, Gamemaker Studio 2 is really the best all-around choice here. Platformers, RPGs, general flash games, and even 3D games can be made with GMS2. (Tutorial playlist links)

Gamesalad – Generally used for mobile app games, it’s not uncommon to see a featured download on the App Store that was made with Gamesalad. For games made to be played on a phone or tablet, Gamesalad’s where you’ll want to go. (Part 1 of Tutorial Videos)

RPG Maker – If you like old school RPGs, then you’ll love RPG Maker. If you’re making a game like The Legend of Zelda or Pokemon, then go ahead and use this one. (Tutorial Playlist) 

Unity  – Used to make 3D games like Kerbal Space Program, Rust, and Battlestar Galactica Online, Unity’s the first choice of several indie developers. It will unfortunately be the hardest on this list, and is usually only used for games with 3D models, but it should not by any means be dismissed. (Part 1 of Tutorial Videos) 

Once you’ve decided upon one such engine, play around with it. Use one of the tutorials linked above and get a feel for what you can and can’t do. Then, when you’ve got a basic feel for it…

4. Give it a Go

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Try and make it happen!

Set about with an idea that won’t take you any longer than a month, then give yourself half a months time longer to account for production errors. If you go over that month and a half-long timeframe, then it may be best to take a step back, figure out what you did wrong, and start again with something new. It’s far too easy to fall into a forever-unending development cycle, and you want to make sure that you finish your work.

When you’re done, ask a few people you know to play it, and collect feedback. Apply that feedback and make changes as necessary.

“And what about when I’m done? What do I do then?”

Start right over from the beginning, my friend, and keep making games over and over again until everyone you know is begging to play your latest release. And then, once you’ve reached that point, keep on going.


Looking for more articles like this? Check out our Game Development is Not Easy article!

Indie Game of the Week – Summoners Fate

A fast and fun turn-based adventure where you use top-down tactical combat and collectible card mechanics to master your strategy. Summoners Fate is a top-down adventure that combines exploration, card collecting and tactical combat. You control the fate of your Summoner and command an ever-changing band of companions. Defeat monstrous hordes and reap the rewards of treasures, allies, and powerful spells as you advance deeper into unknown lands. Are these chance encounters or do they connect to a greater meaning? Combat in Summoners Fate is turn-based, quick and gratifying. Hide behind trees or play a card that brings them to life. Douse your enemies in oil and ignite them with a fireball. Set a trap with a gravity spell to pull an enemy into your clutches. The possibilities are endless.

Support Summoners Fate, here!

In The Valley of Gods – Teaser Trailer

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From the makers of FirewatchIn The Valley of Gods looks to be an amazing graphic world, filled with wonders and adventure.

Traverse the ancient ruins in search of an amazing discovery. Your skills as a filmmaker/explorer will allow you to navigate the passages with ease and reach the top of the ruins in this ancient setting.

As a personal fan of Firewatch, I can’t wait to discover the elaborate story and entrancing setting of In The Valley of Gods.

In The Valley of Gods Announcement Trailer: 

Here are the awesome features we picked up from the trailer:
  • You play as a woman in what appears to be the deserts of Egypt
  • Explore tombs in an extremely detailed high-quality world
  • Like Firewatch, you can see that the developers made use of a walking simulator and camera combination
  • Although characteristics like clothing seem modern, from the camera we can elaborate that it’s based sometime in the 1900’s
  • First-person gameplay
  • Explore the sandy landscape alongside a companion (most likely a sister)
  • This companion may serve as your “Delilah”

Overall, we can’t contain our excitement for this sure to be blockbuster of an indie game. We implore you to check out more, here: http://store.steampowered.com/app/687440/In_The_Valley_of_Gods/ 

 

5 Reasons Why They Are Billions Is So Addictive

Featuring more empty, hungry husks of people than a city centre takeaway on a Saturday night, They Are Billions has swept across Steam like the infection afflicting its billions of in-game villains. What is it that makes the game so addictive? Let’s take a look at a few reasons below…

1. Difficulty Level: Insanity

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Everyone loves a challenge, and in They Are Billions, gamers have found a doozy. Strategy gamers, in particular, seem to be gluttons for punishment, seeking more and more of a tactical trial; and keeping your colony free from infection is one of the toughest in recent memory.

Just one zombie can be the catalyst for bringing the base you’ve worked on for hours to come crashing down. And when there are billions of the blighters running around, one slip can be all it takes to see the plague infecting all of your colonists, and the dreaded game over screen.

Add to that the feeling of triumphant satisfaction when you finally win, and it’s a recipe to keep gamers trying to reach that ultimate goal. After all, the more difficult the battle, the sweeter the victory…

2. Dem Graphics

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While zombies and steampunk are popular (and arguably, overused) choices for games, doing them both together is a winning combination in the case of They Are Billions.

Steampunk, when done well, is a striking and engaging graphic style that has served well titles like 80 Days, Bioshock Infinite and Dishonored, while zombies provide a universally recognised menace that almost anyone can immediately engage with.

Add to that the post-apocalyptic setting and you’re left with an absolutely gorgeous retro-style aesthetic, with vibrantly coloured human settlements holding fast against the endless waves of grey undead flesh.

3. Made Like They Don’t Make Them Anymore

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As many people over a certain age might tell you, the past holds examples of superior craftsmanship and style that have faded away with the inevitable progression of time.

In this instance, I am one of those people – RTS games never seem to be as engaging as I remember, with classic genre titles like Age of Empires II or Command & Conquer holding special places in my heart from my younger days.

As such it’s easy to see how They Are Billions captures the imagination of gamers like me, with its old-school RTS play style that embodies the best of those classics and updates them into the future. Sure, there are a few niggles like the patrol pathway system, but it is still in Early Access, remember…

4. Doom is Inevitable, Why Rush?

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Sometimes games fall into the “bigger and better” trap, where the solution to innovation is making things larger, faster or more complex.

In the case of They Are Billions, it’s almost as if the design process has taken a step back, and bucks the trend of trying to make games that require the reflexes of an alert cat and memorising twenty different hotkeys to play well.

With its pause system, the game encourages players to take as much time as they need to make decisions, plan a strategy, issue orders, and still end up watching your colony fall to the undead hordes. But at least you thought about it first, right?

5. Higher Stakes Than A Vegas Casino

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Despite the apparent safety net that the pause system affords, it’s really easy to forget that one tiny slip up can mean endgame for your colony.

In an era where loading up from a less perilous time when the going gets tough is commonplace, the ruthlessness of They Are Billions’ save state system forces gamers to really pay attention, even being impervious to alt+F4 rage quitting.

Knowing that at any moment, one teeny tiny zombie could infect your whole colony within seconds really raises the stakes – especially when failure means having to start again from square one.

Did we forget any? Post the things you love or hate in the comments. And check out EnomView’s review of They Are Billions here!

Enjoyed this content and want to see even more? Check out how you can support us, here!

AGDQ 2018 – Last Day! (Closing Thoughts)

Yume here from the last day of AGDQ 2018.

Let’s talk about what I think about AGDQ 2018 a bit.

Honestly speaking, after the big batch of tournaments was over, I got a bit “hungover” of the event. The tournaments kind of kept me personally going, entertained, and got me to meet new people of the different communities, especially with the puzzle game tournaments.

It was nonetheless a nice experience and a lot of fun meeting all these people. But in fact, I also kind of felt out of place if I wasn’t around my puzzle community as the not well-known streamer I am right now.

There are a lot of real big fishes around, which was a thing I liked a lot more about the European Speedrunner Assembly 2017. ESA was packed with a lot of smaller streamers. You talked to each other just casually, whereas AGDQ felt like a sales market where big streamers meet big streamers and small streamers meet small streamers to hang out with each other.

Of course, I’m exaggerating here a bit. I also saw people that are well known around the likes of puzzle streamers like me. But, that was a hand full and they knew each other from former GDQ events where people participated and had friends with them. I think it’s also because I’m a first timer at a GDQ that didn’t know how things are at such a big event.

To get to the point: In the end, I have very mixed feelings about how things are at GDQ compared to smaller events, where you have a good time with whoever you are in the same room with at any given moment. Communities kind of do their thing. There are some strays that hop from community to community. But yeah, if you don’t know people and if you are not part of a community, you’re in a bad spot to actually get to know new people. I’m sure it also has a bit to do with my own personality and such things, but mainly it seems like it is a much more introverted event compared to others where people are outgoing, watch you play games, sit next to you, and just start a conversation with you out of the blue.

So from a personal view, I’d recommend going for smaller events like NASA or ESA if you want to have a more easy-going atmosphere around an event or if you just want to meet streamers you know and hang out with them, be it if you are a streamer yourself or just a big fan of them.

Even though this might sound very negative, I’m really happy I got to go to AGDQ and see some of my friends in the communities I’m apart of that I most likely won’t get to see at other events.

Also, I promised some more badges at the start of the week, here they are.

Here’s the badge of the Wario’s Woods runner Peteyboo.

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And here’s the badge of a PuzzleGeneral member that volunteered.

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I think that’s it for this AGDQ. I don’t know which event I’ll cover for a next blog, but you’ll get an update for that in hindsight.

Thanks for reading my blog and I hope you enjoyed the journey!

Have a good day!

One Strike Review – The Quick and Easy Fighter

Have you ever been playing a fighting game and thought to yourself, “this is way too hard?” Well, One Strike is the solution to that exact problem. The game is so simple that it only takes about two-three minutes to be a master at it. The game revolves around six characters who you have the option of playing as. With the character you pick, you will then face off against said six characters back to back. The main catch of the game is that if either player is hit once, they lose. So in the story mode, if you get hit you will restart back to your first fight.

There isn’t much story to the game, it is basically just a 2D, pixelated fighter where you go from fight to fight. The other game modes are a versus mode, which I personally believe would be more fun than the game itself, a tag team mode where you play with an AI against two other AI, a Tournament mode, which puts you into a bracket tournament with up to seven other players, and a “practice” like mode where you face off against the enemies from the story with five lives instead of one. The problem I see with the Tournament mode is the ability to have seven players playing at once. There is no online interaction with the game so it would have to be eight people clustered around a computer with only two playing at a time. And if you do not have eight people for the mode, it replaces them with bots.

The story mode has three difficulties, which are easy, medium, and hard. Easy is in my own opinion far too easy, so once beaten I moved on to medium difficulty, which ramped up the difficulty a little bit, but not enough for it to be a challenge. Finally, when I reached hard mode I was expecting a huge jump in the difficulty of the AI, but alas, I was wrong. All in all, it took me about an hour and a half to beat every difficulty on the main story.

In my personal opinion, the game is not that great, it’s not even that good, but I still gave it a shot and it kept me busy for a while. A few things that could help it out would be to increase the number of characters, thus making the story longer, and have a custom control setup. The controls were kind of tight on the keyboard. The game isn’t inherently bad, it just lacks a story and seemed too easy to master, which is why I did not enjoy it.

With some changes made, I’d love to revisit this article and give it another shot!

EnomView Score 4/10

Liked this review and looking for more cool games? Check out our Steam games section, here!

Medieval Combat Done Right – Mordhau Trailer and Overview

Mordhau, planned for release sometime early this year, is a first-person medieval combat game which has recently been gaining a lot of traction.

While much is yet to be revealed, what we do know is that you play as a knight boasting a sword, slashing at the other players as they charge at you with their weapons.

The combat system is based around mouse-dragging, moving it from side to side to make the sword swing in different ways, at any angle. For example, you could be going up against someone trying to poke at you with their sword, while you come in and in 1 quick swoop take off his head. The system is largely based on Chivalry: Medieval Combat, however, it is said to get rid of the many exploits C:MC had.

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(Yes, this is an actual screenshot from the game)

The graphics in Mordhau are absolutely stunning! The game looks almost photo-realistic, with shimmering chain-mail all the way to the deep red blood. They put so much effort into the looks of every single aspect of the game. So much so that some screenshots almost look like they’re from real life! It’s a shame we can’t play it for ourselves yet.

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If you want to see more, you can go to their official website or their Twitter account.

Mordhau’s Gameplay Trailer:

AGDQ 2018 – Day Five!

Yume here, and we already got to day 5 of this years AGDQ.

As I had a non-existent amount of sleep, the coverage on tournaments will cut a bit short for once, but we’ll still talk puzzles for a bit.

But yeah, there’s a reason why the night was short and I had to sleep into the day. It was time for Awful Games Done Quick.

It is a kind of tradition where games with controls that are close to unplayable, or just really silly games, are shown in this block. It’s been a standing tradition over the last few GDQ events.

This year, the Awful GDQ could also be called “Animal Games Done Quick”, except for some games like Superman 64. Yeah, there are people that speedrun Superman 64.

Let’s go over some of the games though. And if you want to have a really silly and fun time with bad games, you should certainly watch and even play them at some point. The crowd is a big part of this as well. If you want to go over and watch the videos, the block started with Superman 64.

The first game I witnessed in the streaming room was the end portion of Arabian Nights. All I can say about this title is that it’s not really Rated-E and the dialogues are really silly.

After that, was the first game I saw entirely, Enviro-Bear 2000. Five speedrunners were chosen by the people that donate to the cause. The game’s graphics were made in MS Paint, and I’m not talking about the good version of it. You’re a bear that drives a car and has to eat fish and berries in a given amount of time to survive through the winter and enter your cave. “Eat the fish” and “To the cave” chants went through the crowd at appropriate times and made it a spectacle for everybody in the room. The atmosphere was awesome.

Following that, Dog’s Life was on stream. Standard setup: you’re a dog and your girlfriend was kidnapped by a cat lady to be processed into cat food. To be fair, this happens to me at least once a week. The game is rated E (3 years and older) but the dialogues and some cutscenes in the game are, well, questionable (for that rating to say the least). And as the first skip didn’t work as fast as expected, the dog we played was washed enough times so that fur and hide would have been gone. Also a great time and the runner made it a real blast to watch.

The last run I saw at the venue was Animorphs: Shattered Reality. It is a platformer with some kind of battle interaction that mainly consists of running into your enemy to deal damage and trying to not run into their attacks. The controls of the platforming sections were described by the runner Keizaron as this: “Take a Crash Bandicoot game and strip it off everything Crash Bandicoot does well and you have this game”. As a viewer, I have to say it couldn’t be more precise by what I saw. I also had a great time with watching this run, and it certainly deserved to be in this blog.

Next up, we head to the tournaments. Sadly, I slept in for the Puyo Puyo Tetris Swap tourney, where I saw a chance to be somewhat decent in. I caught some of the final rounds and the competition wasn’t really bad. But as a more or less all-rounder, this would have been my best shot at scoring a good placement today. For the ones who don’t know much about Puyo Puyo Tetris, Swap mode is where you play both games, Tetris and Puyo, in the same game. You have specific playing fields for each game and you play for 25 seconds on one game and change to the other until a winner is decided. The finals had some twist to it, PiePusher11 won the tournament. I’ll cover the twist in tomorrow’s article.

Right after that, the dedicated Puyo Puyo tourney took place where we played only Puyo from PPT. I kinda had bad luck with the bracket and got to play FFRPro21 right off the bat, and gave him a run for the money, but still couldn’t defeat him. In the losers bracket, I played against the organiser of the Puyo only tournament, HarpoonCanon, and tried to get around him with good tactics as I don’t hold a candle to him skill-wise. I can say I won 1 out of 5 games against him and gave him some problems, but I never stood a chance to win.

Also shoutouts to the Puyo Puyo Tetris community as a whole. They are a really nice and welcoming people. Be it speedrunners or online players of the game. Mainly, the respectful attitude towards others like me that are likely not the best players, but still give some top players a hard time.

And then I made the worst decision of this AGDQ, tournament-wise. I skipped the Rocket League tourney and instead tried out the Yoshi’s Cookie for SNES one. NEVER…EVER…AGAIN. I want to say I’m decent at the stage clear mode, but versus is not something up my alley. Heck, I tend to be a loud person and curse sometimes, and I could keep it together even in the Pokémon Puzzle League tournament, but this game has the potential to make me lose myself within 5 minutes of Versus mode. I have to admit that the players I lost against had more skill and more knowledge about the versus mode than I had, so there’s simply no need to go further into specifics or hate the game at all.

Well, that’s it for the tournaments that I had an eye on for today.

As for closing words. some communities hold workshops to teach other people some games or techniques to help them get better at designated games. And even I got some private lessons from a person I look up to:

Blinzer, the winner of the Pokemon Puzzle League versus tournament, taught me some techniques and it fried my brain and thumbs. His playstyle and the marathon mode (High score game) were too much for me. The training was a really nice treat from him though and is very much appreciated. In a mere hour, I learned a lot about the basic skills that I still lack as a player that’s only been playing for a year. I could double my speed for inputs in this short time to get it consistently, over what I’m used to. Hence, my thumbs didn’t appreciate it as much as I did.

This is also one of the reasons why these meetups are a very nice event to attend. People help each other understand the games better and show them skills they don’t have right now. It is good to see that people inside a community care for each other and try to help them in person when they finally meet.

Guess I’m signing off for today to get some decent amount of sleep again. A Link to the Past randomizer race coming up tomorrow with a short interview with one of the participants, as I won’t take part in it myself.

Have a great day!

Heres Day Six with some closing costs!