Darkly Atmospheric – Darkwood Review

There’s a quiet and tense energy that pervades the world of Darkwood. It’s not a traditional horror game in that there are monsters leaping out at you from every shadow – but it’s this that makes it even scarier.

Developers Acid Wizard Studio reportedly decided to create a horror game of their own as a result of not being fans of the genre, and after a successful Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign, and a sometimes difficult four years of development in Steam Early Access, Darkwood officially launched in August 2017.

In many ways, this lack of background in horror shines through positively throughout the game. For a start, the top-down mechanic is at least rare, if not unique, in the genre. And all too often, horror games go for the jump scares, while Darkwood prefers a more psychological brand of terror.

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It begins innocuously enough – in the prologue, you play as a man living in a forest cabin and the game teaches you how to move around and manage your inventory. Things get a bit more sinister as you decide whether or not to euthanise your dying dog, and shortly afterwards Darkwood takes a deep breath and takes a long journey into the strange and surreal.

One of the first lessons you learn is to never, ever, under any circumstances, go outside during the night, because you will die a horrible and painful death. The lifeblood of this notion is the gasoline that fuels the generator in your shelter; as long as the lights are on, the paranormal beasties will stay away. Mostly. There are exceptions, such as the foreboding but unaggressive figure who imparts this nocturnal advice, standing with the body of a man and the head of a wolf.

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Cleverly, Darkwood slowly descends into madness, instead of plunging straight in deep. For the first few nights, not much might happen. But I recall early into the story, I was huddled in the bedroom of my shelter when the door swung open. There was nothing there. Another time I was pacing impatiently when I turned back around to find a person sat crying on the bed, desperate to go home.

As the loading screen warns you, Darkwood doesn’t hold you by the hand. Hence my confusion when, despite the earlier warning to never, EVER go outside at night, someone or something began knocking at the door after darkness had fallen. In such a situation, you’re gripped by a terrible indecision; do you go and open the door, or do you ignore it? It’s moments like these that truly set Darkwood aside from other horror games.

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Suffice to say that these are just the tip of a psychedelic iceberg that descends into trippier and scarier depths as the game continues, but I wouldn’t want to be the one to ruin the experience for a new player.

Despite the strange and terrible things that occur, there’s a reassuring logic that sits somewhere in the background; while it doesn’t hold your hand, neither does the game try and trip you up by changing the rules on you for the sake of adding confusion.

While it’s good, things aren’t perfect. The combat system feels very clunky to operate, and particularly from the mid-game on, it’s really difficult to walk away from a fight – and not in an “I appreciated the challenge” type of way.

But that’s a relatively small part of an otherwise phenomenal game. I’m a big fan of minimalist graphic styles, and here we can see an example of a game that basically just uses different shades of grey throughout and look amazing.

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And the sound quality alone is almost worth the cost of admission – moody, sombre drones ramp up the feeling of dread without you even realising it, particularly when you go anywhere near your lupine acquaintance.

Despite a somewhat clunky combat system, Darkwood presents a fresh and engaging take on the horror genre, which stays true to its roots at the same time as striking off in a new direction. Developed by guys who don’t normally like horror games, this one is bound to appeal to scare junkies and newcomers alike.

EnomView Score: 8 out of 10

Inner Space Releases this Tuesday – Trailer

A space flight adventure game developed by Polyknights called Inner Space is being released on Tuesday, tomorrow. Inner Space is an exploration flying game set in a world where physics are inverted. Take command of an unnamed cartographer as you adventure the bubble worlds, collect relics, and encounter each bubbles deity to discover more about its history. You can pick up this game on Linux, Mac OSX, PS4, Switch, Windows, and Xbox One on January 18, 2018!

Note from the creators:

We started PolyKnight Games back in college, when we would meet after class to talk about new challenges in game design. We became fixated on one question in particular: “What would a flying game be like in a universe of inside-out planets?” To answer that question, we decided to put aside our career plans and form our own indie studio.

If you like the idea of a plane that transforms into a submarine, then dives inside the belly of an ancient demigod, you’re in the right place.

 

 

Inner Space Trailer:

You can check out the game’s Steam page here or their website, here.

Robotic Controls – Fragmental Review

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Alright, let’s get this started. Got my robot guy ready, got my name entered, pick some bots, ready to go! Let’s f– Oh, I just fell out of the arena. Okay now I’m ready to– oh something just shot me outside of the arena and blew up my robot guy. Okay now– Oh I got pushed off of the arena. What am I even doing?

Yes, as you begin this game, you’ll be scratching your head pretty hard. First of all, there are no control options. The first few rounds of the game will most likely be spent figuring them out. I couldn’t pick up a weapon for a while until I discovered that you have to push space. Then comes the combat, which is not at all intuitive. Once you face your opponent, you may or may not be aiming at them with your gun. There is no indication that you are firing at them near the wall, or firing directly at the wall. Then there are things that look like walls but are actually chest-high partitions that you can fire over, but you won’t know this until you’ve been shot over it and killed.

The real problem with this game is the control. They are floaty and overly sensitive, so aiming in any conventional sense is an impossibility. It doesn’t matter whether you’re playing on a keyboard or a controller, they just don’t work. Within the first two seconds of a match, you could be dead. If an arena match goes on for too long, they will have a wall of death come from the edge of the arena and shrink in order to destroy the players.

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Fragmental is not based off a player’s skill, it is based on pure dumb luck. With the graphics the way they are, you can barely see your player avatar to know where they are facing. I hope you brought your eye drops because everything is so bright, pink, and shiny that you will be squinting through the entire game. This is not just the background, each robot, which is pretty much the same, has a neon color tinge to them so you can’t tell them apart, as they appear as a tiny spot on the arena.

One good thing that could be said about this game was that there is a decent selection of guns. The icons on the screen indicate what kind of guns are available to you. However, if you try to grab one from across the arena, you will more than likely get shot down by your opponents on your way to get it.

It doesn’t even have to be your opponent that kills you. Literally, anything can kill you in these arenas. Knobs can come from the edge and push you out of bounds, turrets can shoot you from outside of the arena and kill you as soon as it starts and let’s not forget those wonderfully constricting walls of destruction that will kill you in an instant if you touch them.

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So, let’s review. You try to take your time and approach your opponents with some sort of careful calculation, but you will be killed by something beyond your control instead. One minute is entirely too long for this game, you are not on your own schedule, you’re on Fragmental’s time at this point! Taking your time to aim and get use to the controls? Nope! Time to get shot by identical character models to your own! Slide across the arena like the roadrunner, only this time, Wile E. Coyote’s Acme Gun will kill you, no questions asked.

Calling this a game is being very generous. A game is something you can actually win with your own skill and progression through the levels. The control of this game is so awful and fast-paced to the point where you will lose several times before you even gather an inkling of how to play the mechanics that are set up. If you were looking for a challenge such as that, by all means, click the link below.

Enomview rating: 3/10

Check out Fragmental on Steam: http://store.steampowered.com/app/424040/Fragmental/

It’s Not All Fun & Games – Game Development

“I want to be a game developer!” 15-year-old Timmy proclaimed triumphantly, planting a foot down and standing proudly to let the world know that he’d be the greatest dev there ever was.

A game developer you say? You wish to make games for a living? I should warn you, Timmy, that development at any level, from the little league modders to the world champ triple-A’s, is a notoriously grueling process; it is oftentimes a fight on multiple fronts.

“I don’t care!” shouts Timmy stubbornly. “I have been playing video games all my life. I love them more than anything and want to make them for a living.”

Well Timmy, that’s admirable, but know that many a Timmy before you have worn this path down beyond reason with the weathering of their own gruesome treks.

If you still want to be a game dev, Timmy, then here are some things to consider:


  1. Nobody cares about your unique idea.
  • Do not expect to get into a dev studio simply because you have an interesting idea for a game. As is often said, there is no room for a specialized “idea guy” in the video game industry. Everyone in a game development studio is an idea guy in their own right. They just have skills which allow them to make those ideas into a reality through some kind of creative medium. Which leads to our next point…

2. You need to have an actual skill.

There are a lot of disciplines to choose from, but you need to be good at one of them. Can you write a gripping story with few words that won’t be made into a victim of the game’s mechanics? Figure your way around a string of code? Model and animate cool characters, items, and worlds? Write a complete GDD with a feasible scope and make it into something with an engine like Unity or Game Maker Studio 2? If not, now’s the time to start learning. You don’t have to be the greatest, but you should be able to make yourself marketable.

“But I could be a playtester, couldn’t I? I could be someone who plays the games and gives feedback to the designers! It’d be just like what I did in my childhood.” Timmy said, giddy as ever.

Well, you can be a playtester, Timmy. Just know that you’ll be playing the same level over and over again until your eyes grow red and watery, and that you’ll only be searching for bugs; generally speaking, no feedback will be given to the designers. Oh, and the programmers will hate you.

3. You have to be good in teams.

Get ready to work with people you love and people you hate. Get ready to watch your precious ideas get shot down in broad daylight and left to bleed out by your cheery-faced team lead or project director. There are always people like Toby Fox, but it’s rare that anything quality ever gets made if it’s not a part of a collaborative effort. Professionalism, good character, and cooperation is paramount–just like in other fields.

4. Hurry up and wait.

It took over 100 developers roughly 4 years to make Skyrim. Development takes time–a LOT of time–and not just on the programmers’ ends. Get ready to stare at a screen for 12 hours straight and work well into the night–toiling away on a computer in some dark corner in the back of the room.

“I thought it was only the playtesters that had to worry about their eyes,” Timmy said, distraught.

If only that were true, Timmy. If only that were true.

5. It helps to know about game design.

There’s a reason why aspiring developers can take college courses on this stuff. While a sound engineer or a concept artist doesn’t need to know as much about a game narrative as the head designer, a knowledge of psychology behind games will do wonders for you as a dev. Whether it’s about keeping players glued to their screens like Valve has done for years with Team Fortress 2, or forcing out a ragequit like in Cat Mario, being able to dissect a game for its finer components helps–no matter what area you work in on a development team.

6. You need to be able to speak English.

This isn’t a problem for all, but a grasp of the English language will serve you well here. As time progresses, English grows increasingly mandatory in many fields in the mysterious realms of not-game development. If your career as a dev doesn’t work out, then be happy knowing that you’ll still have this universally marketable skill.

“I still want to be a game developer though!” Timmy cried, a fire in his eyes. “Games are my passion!”

Well, Timmy–stubborn or determined–know that I’m not here to (entirely) crush your dreams, because…

7. If you really want to develop video games, then you should totally go for it.

Just make sure you’re realistic. Don’t expect to make a living off of it and don’t expect all your plans to succeed. Start small, look to those of experience, and practice, practice, practice. Whether you’re a modder, a fan dev, or a blockbuster triple-A, you’re bound to have your ups and downs, just like you would at any other job. A life of game development is as equally rewarding as it is a life of hardship. If this is really what you want to do and you feel you’ve got the skills for it, then get out there and make it happen.

As a wise friend of mine liked to say: “Don’t wait for opportunity to come to you. Kick opportunity’s door down and fucking kidnap him.”

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A Profound Adventure That’ll Reach Your Core – Home is Where One Starts Review

Have you ever felt like no one cared? Like you were alone in a world much too big? That’s the feeling of your character while playing through Home is Where One Starts.

The journey begins one day as you wait at the end of your driveway for the bus you had already missed. After you wait for the bus, you’re allowed to explore the area around your house. All the while your character is reminiscing about memories of her past. You can interact with items that spur more memories or allow you to continue with your story. The game also has wonderful music playing throughout your play-through, which is soothing and helps to guide your mind to better understand the character you are being shown.

The world looks beautiful, but that beauty is overshadowed by the pure sadness shown through your characters voice as she relives her past. She talks about the good aspects of her home, but also the bad things. The very bad things. She mentions her father, who is never seen, but from the mass amount of cigarette butts and liquor bottles you can make a guess at what he’s like. Eventually, you’ll find a small graveyard, this allows you to remember something in your fathers dresser, something that will help you get away.


As for the areas, there is a small house which you and your father lived in, your shed in the woods, the hay bales across the street, and even a torn down house next door. Each of these areas help to further the story in their own way, but the one I liked the most was the field behind the house. There wasn’t much there, but just walking through the field was calming and felt almost like a break from the sadness in the game.

The game does have a deep story which will draw you in, but the problem is that there isn’t much to do and there is no guiding point on where to go either. It felt less like a walking simulator, and more like a wandering simulator at times. I stumbled around for quite a while before finding the final of my journey. But for all the wandering I went through, it was worth it to get to the end and see the final scene of the game, and the first bit of real happiness that your character is allowed to have.

EnomView Score: 6 out of 10

 

Dead in Space – Space Pirates and Zombies 2 Review

If there’s ever a game that delivers exactly what it says on the tin, it’s Space Pirates and Zombies 2. You’ve got your pirates, and you’ve got your zombies. Dozens of each. And they whizz around space blowing holes in each other until one wins.

It almost seems like it could be the result of a crazy drunken conversation, like the answer to who’d win in a fight – a caveman or an astronaut? Space pirates or zombies?

But once you get past the initial incongruous premise, there’s a surprising amount of depth that the apparently silly name belies. The unfortunately abbreviated SPAZ2 delivers a persistent galaxy containing 200 unique space captains, each with their own ship and equipment, who can all do exactly what you can as the protagonist.

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This ranges from simply flying around the galaxy map, picking fights and evading stronger rivals, to building starbases and harvesting resources. You can issue bounties, gather allies, and eventually defeat the zombie threat that rears its ugly head again.

I say again, because of course Space Pirates and Zombies 2, as the number at the end there signifies, is a sequel. Not being familiar with the first title, I occasionally got a bit lost with the cast of characters that kept reappearing, and past events being alluded to.

However, the plot is structured in a way that playing the first title isn’t necessary. And there’s a great lore system that lets you unlock historical facts about the background of the franchise and familiarise yourself.

But enough about idling on the galaxy map and the historical facts – the real star of the show in Space Pirates and Zombies 2 is the combat system, paired with a rich and diverse catalogue of parts to customise your perfect mothership.

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There are several types of part – cores, wings, noses, weapons, knees and toes…maybe not the last two. But each part provides different bonuses to shield strength, armour, turn speed, acceleration, and other factors. Weapons operate in a similar way, but different types causing various damage types to enemy ships.

All of these different modules make for an extremely robust and varied system to construct the perfect ship for your playing style. Personally, I opted for a speedy little number that could close in to point-blank range, quickly blast the opponents’ shields away with front-mounted shotguns, and then ram their hull into oblivion.

But equally valid would be a long-range sniper, an artillery ship, a carrier fielding dozens of smaller craft…the variations are extremely diverse. Combat is really fun, and put me in mind of Rebel Galaxy, with the added benefit of being able to skip all of the long haul journeys by switching back to the galaxy map after combat is over.

Get the game:

Even better is that there’s an arena system that lets you try out pre-configured ships with different styles. And of course the other 199 captains in the galaxy can each upgrade their own ships.

The result is a constantly evolving mass of faction politics, betrayals, and sectors changing hands from one group to another as combat rages across the galaxy. And that’s even before we throw the zombies into the mix.

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The undead menace in Space Pirates and Zombies 2 are presented as a mutation of flesh and technology, but essentially, whenever the zombies beat another captain, they join their ranks as per the classic rule of the dead rising again with a hunger for flesh; or biomatter and technology, in this case.

They can be healed by spending a large amount of the game’s sparse and precious fuel source, Rez, or repeatedly battled. Fortunately for the captains of the galaxy of SPAZ2, being defeated doesn’t necessarily mean death; as a last resort, an escape pod takes you to the nearest starbase, or for their vanquished undead counterparts, a spore pod.

The main story will take about 15-20 hours to complete, and there’s a sandbox mode to extend the fun indefinitely. Space Pirates and Zombies 2 is a fun game that balances humour and peril adeptly; it’s pretty to look at, and offers a rich and diverse combat system. You could definitely do a lot worse with a name like Space Pirates and Zombies 2!

EnomView Score: 8 out of 10

Rain Bullets Upon Bullets – Enter the Gungeon Review

What happens when you enter the Gungeon? Do you think you’re ready for what goes on in the Gungeon? Well, you’re wrong! You’re not there to survive, you’re there to conquer! You’re there to kick in the door and throw down! Set your lasers to kill, rain your bullets, and start shooting those bullets that shoot guns! And…wait, what?

Yes, that’s right, after you very quickly enter the Gungeon, you are transported to a world that is solely based around armaments and firearms. The vast majority of your opponents are bullets, shotgun shells and grenades of some assortment. The gameplay is so high octane, if you’re not getting your pulse going, you better do it fast! The game is so fast paced you have no choice but to dunk your head in the deep end and start shooting it up!

The rules and controls are simple and explained to you using a very quick and easy tutorial. In fact, the tutorial is fun and innovative. The humor the game uses is not exactly subtle, but then, neither is the game. It throws you for a loop and starts shooting pretty damn quick. The controls are intuitive and easy to manage, so long as you keep shooting and dodge rolling.

Enter the Gungeon Review

The guns you pick up is half the fun! Seriously, I was not kidding when I said that there is a bullet that shoots guns. There’s a meat gun that shoots blades, there’s even an AK-47! Well, I guess that last one isn’t exactly new, but still! You are given all that you need in the beginning to win this game, so long as you use it right. You will be put through bullet hells, explosions, destruction of all kinds, and come out feeling more awesome because of it. You get better at the game because you want to get better at the game, you want to explore the tunnels of the Gungeon and find out what other guns you can shoot, and what other weird hostiles you will encounter.

As soon as you think you’ve seen it all, BOOM! There’s so much more to see! More bullets, more bombs, more explosives flying all over the place and you’ll even see a bird with a Gatling gun! Don’t try to understand it! Don’t think too hard! Logic has no place here! The time you take trying to think is time you should be firing that weapon into your enemy’s face! Every level has its own quirks that you can have a nice chortle at. Not only is it enjoyable from a gamer’s point of view but anyone watching you play can have fun too.

The wild running and gunning gameplay is so charming that you won’t even worry about the graphics, which are more of a new age 16-bit style. If anyone is concerned about the graphics then you are missing the point entirely! The art style and environments are so well placed and atmospheric that they do not distract you. Though, that is also a downfall for you, the player. As the background also has pitfalls and water that you either need to jump over or teleport over. If not then you fall down them and lose a life, oh well, this stuff happens.

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You have several classes to choose from in the beginning, and half the fun is trying to find one that suits your type of gameplay that you enjoy. Try them all, or try one if it suits your needs, it doesn’t matter. All these classes do is promote replayability, and that is important when you look at purchasing a game. Each one of them has their own perks, pros, and cons that you can use to your advantage.

 

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Get the Game for $6.60 Off!

 

If you haven’t noticed, this game is awesome on pretty much all levels. It controls well, it’s colorful, it’s high intensity, it’s challenging, funny, and just all around a great time. It involves guns and explosions but it is not gory or overly violent. Anyone can play it. So wait, since you’re still reading this review, that probably means you haven’t bought this game yet. What are you waiting for? If you haven’t gotten this game you are missing out on a pulverizing piece of powerful punch that you don’t want to pass up! In fact, you’ll need to start practicing your ambidexterity right now, so open a new tab, and get on steam while still reading this review in a different window! Get the game! Get the collector’s edition! It doesn’t matter! Get it and drench yourself in piles of gunpowder and death!

EnomView Score: 10 out of 10

Like Enter the Gungeon? Check out these other amazing Pixel Art game!

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The Binding of Issac

Chillingly Dark – I Fell From Grace Review

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So much of this game is spent running around. You hop out of windows, you jump at all sounds. Your job is turning to crap and you’re not scraping by. Your life is going down, your wife’s gonna die. You get into a mess to look for some keys, all you can think “SOMETHING HAPPEN PLEASE!” Strange things are afoot and people are talking, no time for that though, you need to get walking. Up and down and up you go, gathering stuff and buying some blow. Stranger dreams keep coming about, then something starts telling you that time’s running out. People are dying and no music is playing, it’s almost like the whole game’s delaying! I’m sorry for rhyming, but the problem is that the game does it too until you shout “Gee Whizz!”

Alright, done with the rhyming, but seriously, the game rhymes throughout its entire playthrough. The game is merciless in the rhyming and while it can be charming at first, it causes a lot of the dialogue to become stilted and bland. “I Fell From Grace” is a puzzle solving game where you play as Henry, a guy who is just simply down on his luck and seems to be taking quite badly, but who can blame him? Not only is his job on the line but his wife is dying and her medical bills are becoming a serious issue. So right off the bat, the guy is relatable.

Check out The Binding of Issac, a similarly dark, amazing game.

The game does set a good tone throughout it, that is, a very bleak and gloomy one. However, that doesn’t really save it from being a little too needlessly complicated in its set up. The big problem is that while the story is going on, you run into some of the most ridiculous roadblocks and detours from seemingly random directions. You’ll be on/ the job and you’ll need to do something, but hark! What’s this? An item for someone to get them to do something? Well, let’s just go downtown and get that item for them because we don’t have money to actually pay them. This game mechanic can work in a lot of cases, but not when it’s the core gameplay and you’ve already killed thirty minutes trying to decipher what’s on each floor of the building you work at.

 

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The story, however, is actually quite interesting. You start having strange dreams and start getting cryptic items from different people and the mail. However, after this happens, the story becomes extremely dark and very strange, which is a good thing. You start making some hard choices and doing some very questionable things to reach your goal. While it is nice that this guy is willing to do nearly everything for his wife, it starts to get a bit ludicrous after a while.

So to recap, we have a very dark and interesting story, a very devoted husband who we can identify with on some level, and a job we all can know and hate. These are all very good story elements, however, does it translate well into a game? The answer is a big huge shrug. There is a crowd for this type of game for sure. However, if you are not a huge fan of puzzle games nor are you a big fan of the story elements in a game, this is definitely not a game for you. There is a lot of backtracking and it kind of forces you to know where things are or else you will be wandering around for quite a while before it allows you to advance.

That is not exactly a strike against the game, though, as there are people who enjoy that type of game. There is an element of mystery that it builds throughout and starts to pull you in. You get items that change your luck such as medicine with amazing effects. People start coming up and talking to you, telling you that things are going to start happening. While you think that these are good things, the deeper you go, the more dreadful things are actually becoming.

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If you are in this for the heart-pounding narrative, you should probably just turn back now. The game has some things going for it, but a pulse is not one of them. The worst part of this game is how much it drags, especially at the very beginning before you start getting to the meat of the storyline. Some of the plot elements take entirely too long to develop and there is a risk of losing interest if you are not enveloped into it early on. First impressions do not do this game any favours. While the game does get to that amazing point eventually, the level of excitement is lacking. Some may consider it outright boring.

With a lack of music, for the most part, it is quite impressive that this game has the tone that it does. If you can get beyond some of its shortcomings, you can get some good gameplay out of this game. It’s only around 2 – 3 hours of gameplay and the price may make you cringe at the prospect, but it’s worth a shot if you find the premise interesting. Overall, I would recommend it for fans of the darker puzzle games or adventures willing to delve into the depths of this grim, virtual world.

EnomView Score: 8 out of 10

Upcoming Indie Games on Steam

With triple-A titles dominating the market, it’s easy to forget those creative self-startup devs, sealed in their basements with starry eyes and brimming bouts of hope, ready to entertain the online world with innovative design, art, and stories. Here are three games that the folks at Enomview feel you should keep a careful eye on in the near future.

Tunic

 

Playing as a minute little fox, players will find a world with creepy ruins, ancient monsters, and a harrowing, but cute, environment to traipse around in. With modern graphics, sound design, and animation, Tunic plays a lot like a revamped version of just the franchise that Shouldice was inspired by…

…and that–my friends–is a very, very good thing.

We Happy Few

 

 

Combining a cheery, but fittingly unsettling, cartoony art style with story, We Happy Few is a survival horror game developed by Compulsion Games. Initially set to release on July 26th, 2016, We Happy Few has been in early access for some time now, but the neverending dev cycle should come to close soon in 2018.

Under the influence of corrupt, government overseers, the game tells the story of a small, British society that’s been under the influence of decades-long propaganda, informing its citizens to always remain under the influence of the elusive, pink drug: “joy”. Joy can be found not only in the form of a daily pill, but in the food, the water, and just about everything that a person can consume in this messed up little realm.

Told through the perspective of three different characters that decide to stop taking the drug and rebel–giving us the chance to see the effects of science run amok in the scope of fully open world to explore.

Best of luck–and remember–don’t forget to take your joy.

Kingdom Come: Deliverance

 

 

Skyrim with realism and so much more–Kingdom Come: Deliverance lives up to its name as the holy salvation to fans of medieval games everywhere. Brought to us by the Czechian Warhorse Studios, we’re set to see this title release in early February of this year.

With a first-person, 16 square kilometer-wide open world, Kingdom Come: Deliverance comes packed with a myriad of things for the player to engross himself in. Craft items, level skills, make weighted decisions to complete quests, combine alchemical ingredients to make something new, ride horses, take part in large-scale, 15th-century battles, and kick back to a story that’ll be sung in beer halls and taverns all over Europe for time immemorial.

Answer the knight’s call. Give thy sword for land and lord.

(This game was also mentioned in our Top 10 Indie Games to Look Out for in 2018)

The Padre: A Point and Click Adventure of Terror

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Have you ever gotten the feeling someone or something is watching you? That creepy, eerie feeling that something could jump out at any second? That’s exactly how you will feel every second you play The Padre. The game is a horror point n’ click, where you, a troubled Catholic priest, attempts to solve puzzles within a flashback. Survive being hunted by the mysterious figures lurking in the dark. The enemies span from a wide array of creepy villains such as Zombies, Ghosts, Spiders and even the recurring Demons. There are also a lot of references to other games, such as the Half-Life series and even the Legend of Zelda game’s iconic “It’s dangerous to go alone. Take this”.

Your journey all begins in your own room, far from the mansion you will experience the main horrors in, but you are sent out on a mission to find a missing companion, Cardinal Benedictus. This journey leads you on the road for many days before you end up at the mansion. You enter seeking refuge, but in return find yourself trapped in a room with a loud banging noise.

Although the threat of the enemies is fear-inspiring, the puzzles are what will be the biggest trouble. Puzzles offer a wide range of complexities that you might notice without some digging. One of the first puzzles involves three rooms, the starting room where loud bangs can be heard from below, a dressing room where jumpscares will pop up when you least expect them, and a bedroom, where a zombie mother sings lullabies to an empty room.

The controls are a little finicky, which is to be expected with a point and click game. The way the camera angle changes as you move can sometimes mess your sense of direction up. I would recommend pressing escape as soon as you enter the game to familiarize yourself with the controls. That small act will help you understand the game a lot faster. Your character menu is also slightly difficult to understand at first. The items you can equip and the items you cannot are not separated, only being distinguished when clicked on. This makes it so you will never know which item could be useful in a given situation, like running from an angry zombie. Finally, there is no good way to tell how much damage you have taken, but there is medicine that heals health, so drink up if you know you took some damage.

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For those who want to see how the combat works in the game, there is also an option at the start menu called “Survive… Try” which puts you into a graveyard where waves of spiders and zombies will attack you. All you are given is a crowbar, a machete, a pistol with 12 rounds, and some torches. I played this mode quite a bit to see how far I could go but sadly never made it that far, being overcome by the various hordes.

I truly enjoyed my playthrough of The Padre, and even though the game is still in its alpha phase, the updates soon to come are phenomenal. They are constantly adding more gameplay and lore to the game and we can’t wait to try a finished copy. When more sounds and story are added, everyone will want to get hands-on with this title. One final tip to leave you off with: beware of what lurks in the shadows, but don’t be shy to give away a few items along the way.

EnomView Score: 9 out of 10

Check out The Padre here.